Yes

Paul Summerville • April 15, 2016

What I’m listening to. 

Mozart - Symphony in F Major "No. 43", K.76 (42a): II. Andante

Can these habits be turned to saving and investing?

New York Times -- The Minecraft Generation

How a clunky Swedish computer game is teaching millions of children to master the digital world.

Talking about immigration.

Paul Summerville • April 15, 2016

What I’m listening to. 

"Coffee Cantata" BWV 211: "Ei! wie schmeckt der Coffee susse"

Changing our world.

Sunday Times Magazine-- From YouTube to Our Tube

It’s pushing to be the planet’s most powerful broadcaster with the launch of its subscription service. CEO Susan Wojcicki tells us why YouTube is no longer just for the kids.

Eggheads.

Paul Summerville • April 13, 2016

What I'm listening to.

Mozart: Symphony No. 4 in D major, K. 19

Leaping in China (and running to Vancouver).

Paul Summerville • April 12, 2016

What I’m listening to. 

Gluck - Orfeo ed Euridice - Dance of the Blessed Spirits

Why ‘remainers’ need to make a better economic case.

Financial Times -- Britain’s pro-Europe campaigners are losing the argument

The main economic factors in favour of EU are not trade, but research, science and innovation policy

Related.

Paul Summerville • October 4, 2014

Can the developed world break out of the Japan trap? 

Telegraph -- Is it time for central bankers to unwind their policies?

Paul Summerville • September 29, 2014

An upside down Chinese national flag appears next to a Hong Kong flag outside a commercial building which is in front of a main road occupied by thousands of protesters in Hong Kong, Monday, Sept. 29, 2014. Pro-democracy demonstrators defied onslaughts of tear gas and appeals from Hong Kong's top leader to go home, as the protests over Beijing's decision to limit political reforms expanded across the city early Monday.

Paul Summerville • September 28, 2014

Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow. 

New York Times -- How to Stop Time

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Twin Virtues: Inequality of Outcomes & Equality of Opportunity©

Twin Virtues

Ultimately, the most successful societies find the balance between the twin virtues of inequality of outcomes and equality of opportunity.

The new politics must marry the twin virtues of unequal outcomes and equality of opportunity.

When too few get too much everybody loses.

Feminism is about women living their lives on their own terms, marshalling the resources of the society to make that possible, and men embracing this as vital to a successful society and their own liberation.

Can it be that striving for equality of opportunity however imperfect the process not only benefits the individual but also creates benefits for the society that are unintended but wonderful?

Economics must be a 'moral enterprise' as much as politics claims to be. Economic outcomes need to be framed in terms of right and wrong not just efficiency if only because these often align in surprising ways that are good for society and the economy.

My vision of Canada is that any Canadian child from a family of limited circumstance can expect to have a chance at lifetime of unlimited opportunities.

Free trade is a wonderful thing. Time and time again economists have proven that free trade creates enormous wealth for each country 'on the whole'. Historians have shown that free trade is usually associated with rising political, social and cultural liberty. The perennial problem is that free trade always creates tremendous disruption for thousands even millions of individuals often concentrated in one geography, and where the state is idle, not investing in best in class instruments of social justice, free trade can be a permanent ticket out of the middle class, down, not up.

Tax policy should be founded on the principle of generating steady tax revenues sufficient to maximise environmentally sustainable economic growth in order to fund fair government.

Public policy should be designed to decrease inequality before the law and increase equality of opportunity.

Capitalism is not the problem; the problem is what we do with capitalism.

Content is always more difficult to argue than conspiracy.

Let the state regulate and the market operate (most things).

Welfare strategies are best designed as a hand up, not as a hand out.

Political debate should not be fact free fighting.

Explanation lasts longer than eloquence.

Always favour empowerment over dependency.

The most enduring public figures are embraced for the causes they fought for and not the concept of themselves they hoped others would remember them by.

Find your voice and don't be the echo of somebody else.

It is possible to operate on two different levels: the practical, cautious and conservative; and the realm of ideas, open, free, and radical.