Drugs

Paul Summerville • May 19, 2016

Cruel cartoon.

What I’m listening to. 

The Nutcracker, Act 1 Tableau I: Part II March

Lots of work after June 23rd.

Cameron’s toughest time will begin on June 24

Even if he wins the referendum, the prime minister will face growing calls for his departure. He needs a 1,000-day plan.

Parliamentary games in London too.

Paul Summerville • June 27, 2012

Commentary on the linkages in the global economy, forced abortions in China, the rise and fall of American cities, the case for ending the ‘war’ on drugs, and teaching Omar.

Mr. Prime Minister?

Paul Summerville • April 12, 2012

Commentary on cheery cherry blossoms, what we can learn from how the Germans run their economy, George Will on legalising drugs, Shilling’s warning, a slow death, and Chretien’s mistake.

Sakura, sakura. Thanks to Jeremy of Tokyo for the picture.

Japan Times – Sakura Stories
Drinking and eating under the glorious first flowering trees each spring is a tradition that has endured for hundreds of years in Japan.

The German model.

Paul Summerville • June 4, 2011

The global economy is coming to grips with some nasty realities.

The Euro is on the verge of being restructured, inflation in the low income countries is a serious threat to their economic and political stability, and the United States is in the first stages of a long structural economic redesign.

Lot’s to think about.

Paul Summerville • October 18, 2010

Happy birthday to us.

Special thanks to original subscribers David (London), Barry and Gordon (Victoria), Wayne (Aurora), Bill and  John (Toronto), Rodney (Sydney), Tony (Tokyo), Andrew (Singapore), Hui (Washington), and Marcus (London, UK).

And to the people I golf with at VGC who offer lots of content and style advice, particularly Pat, Gordon, Nick, Bob, and Simon.

Evan and I thank you for the hundreds of content suggestions that we received from everyone during this first year.

 

Paul Summerville • November 25, 2009

In the almost three years since President Felipe Calderón launched a war on drug cartels, border towns in Mexico have turned into halls of mirrors where no one knows who is on which side or what chance remark could get you murdered. Some 14,000 people have been killed in that time—the worst carnage since the Mexican Revolution—and part of the country is effectively under martial law. Is this evidence of a creeping coup by the military? A war between drug cartels? Between the president and his opposition?

Paul Summerville • November 12, 2009

In the almost three years since President Felipe Calderón launched a war on drug cartels, border towns in Mexico have turned into halls of mirrors where no one knows who is on which side or what chance remark could get you murdered. Some 14,000 people have been killed in that time—the worst carnage since the Mexican Revolution—and part of the country is effectively under martial law. Is this evidence of a creeping coup by the military? A war between drug cartels? Between the president and his opposition?

Keep up with CEF!

User login

Login using social networks

Twin Virtues: Inequality of Outcomes & Equality of Opportunity©

Twin Virtues

Ultimately, the most successful societies find the balance between the twin virtues of inequality of outcomes and equality of opportunity.

The new politics must marry the twin virtues of unequal outcomes and equality of opportunity.

When too few get too much everybody loses.

Feminism is about women living their lives on their own terms, marshalling the resources of the society to make that possible, and men embracing this as vital to a successful society and their own liberation.

Can it be that striving for equality of opportunity however imperfect the process not only benefits the individual but also creates benefits for the society that are unintended but wonderful?

Economics must be a 'moral enterprise' as much as politics claims to be. Economic outcomes need to be framed in terms of right and wrong not just efficiency if only because these often align in surprising ways that are good for society and the economy.

My vision of Canada is that any Canadian child from a family of limited circumstance can expect to have a chance at lifetime of unlimited opportunities.

Free trade is a wonderful thing. Time and time again economists have proven that free trade creates enormous wealth for each country 'on the whole'. Historians have shown that free trade is usually associated with rising political, social and cultural liberty. The perennial problem is that free trade always creates tremendous disruption for thousands even millions of individuals often concentrated in one geography, and where the state is idle, not investing in best in class instruments of social justice, free trade can be a permanent ticket out of the middle class, down, not up.

Tax policy should be founded on the principle of generating steady tax revenues sufficient to maximise environmentally sustainable economic growth in order to fund fair government.

Public policy should be designed to decrease inequality before the law and increase equality of opportunity.

Capitalism is not the problem; the problem is what we do with capitalism.

Content is always more difficult to argue than conspiracy.

Let the state regulate and the market operate (most things).

Welfare strategies are best designed as a hand up, not as a hand out.

Political debate should not be fact free fighting.

Explanation lasts longer than eloquence.

Always favour empowerment over dependency.

The most enduring public figures are embraced for the causes they fought for and not the concept of themselves they hoped others would remember them by.

Find your voice and don't be the echo of somebody else.

It is possible to operate on two different levels: the practical, cautious and conservative; and the realm of ideas, open, free, and radical.