You Tube and Your TV, Central Bankers Broken Tools, Equal Time, Living Hell, Annual Review Shudder, Queen’s Question

What I’m listening to. 

"Coffee Cantata" BWV 211: "Ei! wie schmeckt der Coffee susse"

Changing our world.

Sunday Times Magazine-- From YouTube to Our Tube

It’s pushing to be the planet’s most powerful broadcaster with the launch of its subscription service. CEO Susan Wojcicki tells us why YouTube is no longer just for the kids.

Eggheads.

Project Syndicate -- What’s Wrong With Negative Rates?

I wrote at the beginning of January that economic conditions this year were set to be as weak as in 2015, which was the worst year since the global financial crisis erupted in 2008. And, as has happened repeatedly over the last decade, a few months into the year, others’ more optimistic forecasts are being revised downward.

Trump’s ed-op.

Wall Street Journal -- Let Me Ask America a Question

How has the ‘system’ been working out for you and your family? No wonder voters demand change.

Endless nightmare.

The Atlantic -- The Hell After ISIS

Even as the militant group loses ground in Iraq, many Sunnis say they have no hope for peace. One family’s story shows why.

Yuck. (ed’s note -- my rule was simple, review had to be 360 degrees, otherwise, piss off)

Financial Times -- Treat staff like adults and scrap their review

Grading individuals against objectives set 12 months previously feels ridiculously old-school.

Hard Work

The Times -- Old master, his student pal or fake: how to spot the real deal

A newly discovered painting awaits designation as a lost Caravaggio. Rachel Campbell-Johnston picks apart the notoriously tricky business of authenticating works of art.

Economists wrongfooted

Telegraph -- It’s no wonder voters lose faith in the system if our financial experts fail to see trouble coming 

What’s the point of economic policymakers? 

 

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Twin Virtues: Inequality of Outcomes & Equality of Opportunity©

Twin Virtues

Ultimately, the most successful societies find the balance between the twin virtues of inequality of outcomes and equality of opportunity.

The new politics must marry the twin virtues of unequal outcomes and equality of opportunity.

When too few get too much everybody loses.

Feminism is about women living their lives on their own terms, marshalling the resources of the society to make that possible, and men embracing this as vital to a successful society and their own liberation.

Can it be that striving for equality of opportunity however imperfect the process not only benefits the individual but also creates benefits for the society that are unintended but wonderful?

Economics must be a 'moral enterprise' as much as politics claims to be. Economic outcomes need to be framed in terms of right and wrong not just efficiency if only because these often align in surprising ways that are good for society and the economy.

My vision of Canada is that any Canadian child from a family of limited circumstance can expect to have a chance at lifetime of unlimited opportunities.

Free trade is a wonderful thing. Time and time again economists have proven that free trade creates enormous wealth for each country 'on the whole'. Historians have shown that free trade is usually associated with rising political, social and cultural liberty. The perennial problem is that free trade always creates tremendous disruption for thousands even millions of individuals often concentrated in one geography, and where the state is idle, not investing in best in class instruments of social justice, free trade can be a permanent ticket out of the middle class, down, not up.

Tax policy should be founded on the principle of generating steady tax revenues sufficient to maximise environmentally sustainable economic growth in order to fund fair government.

Public policy should be designed to decrease inequality before the law and increase equality of opportunity.

Capitalism is not the problem; the problem is what we do with capitalism.

Content is always more difficult to argue than conspiracy.

Let the state regulate and the market operate (most things).

Welfare strategies are best designed as a hand up, not as a hand out.

Political debate should not be fact free fighting.

Explanation lasts longer than eloquence.

Always favour empowerment over dependency.

The most enduring public figures are embraced for the causes they fought for and not the concept of themselves they hoped others would remember them by.

Find your voice and don't be the echo of somebody else.

It is possible to operate on two different levels: the practical, cautious and conservative; and the realm of ideas, open, free, and radical.